The Learner Voice: Part 3

by | Nov 3, 2016 | Featured, The Learner Voice

L&D professionals around the globe are hungry to create a learner-centric strategy that puts staff at the heart of their activity. What can millennials teach us about supporting learning in the workplace?

The focus on today’s younger generation joining the workforce has provided a renewed vigour for L&D professionals to review their current provision. They are looking to modernise learning to address the perceived needs of a new generation of demanding and digital workers.

Despite good intentions and an increased proliferation of technology being used in learning, our vision for change seems to be continually out of reach. Why is that?

This third Learner Voice study challenges our perception that millennials learn differently from other workers. It also highlights that our staff are more self-directed that L&D give them credit for.

As we support self-directed learners, L&D have the opportunity to support and encourage a culture of learning that allows organisations to be responsive, agile and successful.

The Learner Voice series aims to help L&D leaders challenge assumptions about workplace learning, whilst identifying new opportunities to connect with and engage their staff.

What you’ll learn in this report:

  • How are staff actually learning what they need to do their jobs?
  • What motivates today’s self-directed learner?
  • How digitally confident are today’s knowledge workers?
  • What is stopping engagement with online learning?

In The Learner Voice: Part 3, we look at a random sample of over 4,700 workers who took part in a Learning Landscape Audit from Sept 2015 to Sept 2016, to consider the question: what can millennials teach us about learning?

 

We found out that learning innovation is for the majority, not just millennials and that staff are more self-directed in their learning approaches than most L&D professionals believe. We share these critical insights to show L&D professionals how to build a truly learner-centric strategy that can support an agile, responsive learning culture, critical for future success.

 

 

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  • Free Resources

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