Implementing Successful Social ‘peer-to-peer’ Learning at Sante Fe

by | Feb 9, 2015 | Case Studies

Santa Fe Group is a worldwide provider of employee relocation and workplace services that support multinational businesses and their international growth. 

Following the merger of three companies into one company and one culture requiring a consistency of message, learning and service delivery across diverse geographies (260 offices across 54 countries) and a 1:3000 L&D Lead to staff ratio, a different way of delivering learning and talent needed to be implemented.

Cultural diversity wasn’t the only challenge that the new group now faced. Prior to the merger, there was just one L&D manager for EMEA in one business sector and a trainer in Perth but no other dedicated L&D staff. There were annual regional conferences run for 120-150 staff plus two annual week long Academy courses for the EMEA region  (in one business sector only) with a cohort of approximately 20 per course, plus some ad hoc local training.There were also concerns about broadband width in more remote locations, especially in the emerging markets of the Far East, and IT were unable to fully engage due to their own busy agenda, plus supporting local IT as well as central IT.

Social technology had been implemented in one area previously, with limited success due to limited audience and no driver, so it had a poor image. Certain business managers who had pre-conceived ideas of ‘elearning’ would not even look at the platform for themselves or their staff and even personal engagement didn’t work.There were also concerns about broadband width in more remote locations, especially in the emerging markets of the Far East, and IT were unable to fully engage due to their own busy agenda, plus supporting local IT as well as central IT.

There was no global centralised HR, performance management or measures in place so there was a need to build a virtual L&D team across three regions to ensure localised input and success.

The Solution

A social learning and community platform solution across the product portfolio was sought to bring people together in one space, cross border – something that was never done before. The specific idea was to marry informal and formal learning with great learning conversations for social learning.The answer was the Learn Share Grow methodology (based on the 70:20:10 model but presented in a way that reflected SFG’s global culture) adopted by The Academy as a way of crossing cultural barriers was implemented.

To read the full story and get 9 tips for successfully adopting social learning, download the case study below.

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