New Learning Agenda part 2: Learning Transformation – turning talk into action!

by | Dec 11, 2013 | Articles

In November Towards Maturity Launched ‘The New Learning Agenda’ outlining recommendations for the business and L&D professionals as a result of their 2013-14 Towards Maturity Benchmark. In the second of three articles, we look at learning transformation and why we have to turn talk into action.

This year, Towards Maturity’s Benchmark celebrates a decade of collecting data and insights into the use of learning technologies to support organisational transformation.  Over the last ten years, I have seen countless presentations and delivered a fair few myself, that discuss how organisational learning needs to change to keep up with the nature of today’s (and yesterday’s) fast paced working environments.

During that time, we’ve seen arguments that the learning department needs to become more aligned[1]- changing from order taker to business partner. We’ve been convinced that delivery must move from discreet face-to-face learning events available to a few to anytime, anywhere learning opportunities for the masses. We’ve argued that we need to place as much emphasis, if not more, on supporting informal learning as delivering formal learning (in fact 79% in the Towards Maturity 2006 benchmark agreed that they wanted to place greater emphasis on supporting informal learning within the organisation). Across the last three years, those arguing for the learning transformation story have built on these themes and have widened the scope to include the need to support workplace performance, embrace the 70:20:10 Model and more.

Technology has a significant role to play in this type of learning transformation and ten years is a long time in the technology world. Over that period, we have become comfortable with how technology can enable the delivery of learning and automate standard offerings. As a result, we still have catalogues of courses – only now they are accessed via the LMS and are an hour long instead of a day. We still have lectures laced with PowerPoint but now we can access them virtually. We’ve learned how to bringing efficiency to learning but is this enough?

The Oxford Dictionary defines transformation as ‘A marked change in form, nature or appearance’.  So have we seen a marked change in nature and appearance of learning over that time or has it been mainly talk of change with action on cost reduction? Well, Towards Maturity’s unique data from 2,900 participants over the last ten years provides some deep insights into how learning is changing. Or in many cases, how it isn’t!

Despite the rhetoric and excitement we still find that in 2013:

  • When it comes to alignment only three in five organisations strongly agree that their learning initiatives support the skills businesses need
  • When it comes to using technology to increase learning opportunities, still only 26% of formal learning is e-enabled
  • When it comes to redressing the balance of resource allocation, only 18% of L&D resources are allocated to supporting informal learning
  • When it comes to even the most basic opportunities to support performance, only 26% of L&D teams provide staff with access to job aids online

 

To read the rest of the article please download the pdf below. You will first need to login or register to join our research community.

Other related articles:

Article originally appeared in Inside Learning Technologies & Skills

Related downloads

Compare your L&D strategy with the Towards Maturity Learning Health Check

Compare your L&D strategy

Review your L&D strategy to discover your strengths and opportunities for improvement with the Towards Maturity Learning Health Check.

Featured content

La Vie en Rose, does seeing ‘life in pink’ matter?

La Vie en Rose, does seeing ‘life in pink’ matter?

Learning can be defined in many ways, but most psychologists would agree that it is a relatively permanent change in behaviour that results from experience. The three major types of learning described by behavioural psychology are; classical conditioning, operant conditioning and observational learning. In order for learning to stick and becomes the new normal, all three types require self-driven will. Therefore, how people view the world through their lens matters.

Towards Maturity Learning Health Check season extended to Monday 16 September. Early 2019 results highlight that only 7% of L&D leaders report that their organisation encourages and provides time for reflection*

Towards Maturity Learning Health Check season extended to Monday 16 September. Early 2019 results highlight that only 7% of L&D leaders report that their organisation encourages and provides time for reflection*

By popular demand, the 2019 Learning Health Check season has now been extended until Monday 16th September. There is still enough time to complete your review and revisiting regularly can also help learning professionals to measure progress year on year, highlight areas where improvement is needed and provide evidence to build a business case for change.

Featured

La Vie en Rose, does seeing ‘life in pink’ matter?

La Vie en Rose, does seeing ‘life in pink’ matter?

Learning can be defined in many ways, but most psychologists would agree that it is a relatively permanent change in behaviour that results from experience. The three major types of learning described by behavioural psychology are; classical conditioning, operant conditioning and observational learning. In order for learning to stick and becomes the new normal, all three types require self-driven will. Therefore, how people view the world through their lens matters.

Our Supporters also influence Towards Maturity's Health Check and research, providing insights on future trends and practices that should be investigated.

Pin It on Pinterest