Immersive learning environments – what’s working and what’s not?

by | May 29, 2012 | Articles

There has been a lot of discussion in the learning industry about the use of games, simulations and other immersive experiences to engage staff but what is actually working?

During May 2012 we have been asking organisations how they are using these technology to create meaningful experiences for learners.

Organisations from a wide range of sectors including health, defence, education, energy and finance have been sharing their ideas and the results will be published in the Summer.

Click HERE to take part – study is open until 1st June.

Here are some of the early findings:

  • The top drivers for introducing immersive learning environments include increase learner confidence (reported by 60% of the sample) and improving engagement in the learning process (reported by 70%).
  • Currently organisations are most likely to embed immersive learning approaches (such as games, simulations or scenarios) into their self paced content (85% do this)
  • Moving forward there is a significant interest in using purposeful games and video simulations to help staff build skills  (over 50% are planning to introduce)

The full study will also look into the learning approaches that we are borrowing from the gaming industry, the benefits being delivered and the barriers to adoption.

If you haven’t had a chance to take part, we’d love to know your views .

Click HERE to take part – study is open until 1st June.

We are conducting this short study, in conjunction with our ambassador Toolwire,  & we will be sharing the results later this summer.

Practice bike image courtesy of clarkmaxwell

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