How to work with external e-learning experts

by | Nov 30, 2010 | Articles

Looking for external experts to support you in your journey with learning technologies? Take a look at this independant checklist to help you get best value.  

At some point in time, most organisations turn to external experts for an extra helping hand but how can we make sure we are getting value for money?

The Towards Maturity Benchmark 2010 revealed that over 60% of organisations found that lack of knowledge about the potential use of learning technologies was a real barrier to implementation. Some of this knowledge gap can be addressed through formal learning or via our networks but often organisations may need to turn to external experts to provide an additional helping hand.

This HOW TO provides  a checklist of ideas and guidelines that can be used to select and work with external experts.

This HOW TO is aimed at L&D professionals who are implementing learning technologies in the business but who don’t have all the necessary expertise – or time – in-house.

The HOW TO covers:

  • What should we be looking for when selecting an external expert?
  • Are we ready?
  • How do we identify the right person/organisation to work with?
  • How can we control costs?
  • How do we build confidence in the results?

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