Delivering results with learning technology in the workplace -new research from Becta

by | Feb 17, 2010 | Case Studies, Evidence for Change

Becta have recently launched a new report that consolidates the evidence for employer efficiencies and tangible business benefit resulting from effective use of learning technology in the workplace.

Becta have recently launched a new report that consolidates the evidence for employer efficiencies and tangible business benefit resulting from effective use of learning technology in the workplace.

‘We need a robust evidence base to support change’

Following consultation with a wide range of experts in learning and development over the last year, Becta committed to support organisations by developing a robust evidence base of efficiency gains that can be achieved by using technology effectively in the workplace.

Organisations are under increasing pressure to up-skill employees faster and improve business agility but with fewer resources than ever before. In addition, business priorities are constantly changing, further increasing the pressure on hard stretched learning and development professionals.

Research shows that many organisations are looking beyond the traditional use of technology to deliver compliance training and considering how learning technologies can be used to redefine how learning can support business priorities. However, many remain sceptical about the benefits.

If technology is used appropriately in learning, can it help organisations to survive, become more agile and efficient and thrive as we come through the recession? Some would say yes but, until now, good evidence of its impact has been scattered and difficult to come by.

The absence of independent facts and figures means that many who want to consider new approaches to meeting business needs are at risk of making decisions without a firm foundation on which to build their business case. As a result, many implementations are driven by technology rather than business need, resulting in poor engagement, a bad experience and a lost opportunity.

Consolidating the evidence

This publication sets out to bring together recent evidence of the efficiencies brought about by the use of technology to support learning and development in the workplace.

The aims of this work, conducted in support of Becta’s Next Generation Learning in the workplace are:

  • to consolidate evidence of the impact of learning technologies to inspire those looking to support changing business needs
  • to provide independent value propositions to help those looking to demonstrate value in order to engage their organisation more fully

The study identified where learning technologies were adding business value and reports findings in 8 themes:

  1. Time Saving
  2. Productivity Gains
  3. Staff Benefit
  4. Business Impact
  5. Tangible quality improvement for learning
  6. Impact of Social Learning
  7. Green Issues
  8. Cost Savings

The links to all 50 case studies are included in the appendix for those who want to dig deeper!

The report was prepared by an independent research team, led by Towards Maturity Enterprises and involving the Institute of Work Based Learning together with a number of respected industry analysts who reviewed over 180 articles and reports and 48 case studies in a search for tangible evidence of workplace success.

Featured content

La Vie en Rose, does seeing ‘life in pink’ matter?

La Vie en Rose, does seeing ‘life in pink’ matter?

Learning can be defined in many ways, but most psychologists would agree that it is a relatively permanent change in behaviour that results from experience. The three major types of learning described by behavioural psychology are; classical conditioning, operant conditioning and observational learning. In order for learning to stick and becomes the new normal, all three types require self-driven will. Therefore, how people view the world through their lens matters.

Towards Maturity Learning Health Check season extended to Monday 16 September. Early 2019 results highlight that only 7% of L&D leaders report that their organisation encourages and provides time for reflection*

Towards Maturity Learning Health Check season extended to Monday 16 September. Early 2019 results highlight that only 7% of L&D leaders report that their organisation encourages and provides time for reflection*

By popular demand, the 2019 Learning Health Check season has now been extended until Monday 16th September. There is still enough time to complete your review and revisiting regularly can also help learning professionals to measure progress year on year, highlight areas where improvement is needed and provide evidence to build a business case for change.

Featured

La Vie en Rose, does seeing ‘life in pink’ matter?

La Vie en Rose, does seeing ‘life in pink’ matter?

Learning can be defined in many ways, but most psychologists would agree that it is a relatively permanent change in behaviour that results from experience. The three major types of learning described by behavioural psychology are; classical conditioning, operant conditioning and observational learning. In order for learning to stick and becomes the new normal, all three types require self-driven will. Therefore, how people view the world through their lens matters.

Our Supporters also influence Towards Maturity's Health Check and research, providing insights on future trends and practices that should be investigated.

Pin It on Pinterest