The bottom line impact of success at NCALT

by | Nov 5, 2009 | Case Studies, Evidence for Change

The National Centre for Applied Learning Technologies (NCALT) was established in April 2002 and is a collaboration between the National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA) and the Metropolitan Police (MPS). 

They provide e-learning services to 43 Police forces in the UK, delivering 40,000 e-learning activities each month. They won numerous e-learning awards in 2008 including:
  • Winner of the ‘e-learning industry award for outstanding achievement – corporate’
  • Gold Winner for ‘Excellence in the Production of Learning Content’,
  • And earning a ‘Special Mention’ in the ‘Best e-learning project securing widespread adoption’
We published a case study on their achievements and experiences which you can read here. Since then they haven’t stood still and we invited NCALT to work with us to provide some hard-hitting statistical and financial evidence of the impact that learning technologies are having across the 43 Home Office Police Forces in the UK. This is part of our ‘Evidence for Change’ research programme to support the business case for learning technologies in the workplace.
 
NCALT have seen:
  • Aprojected saving of £10.5 million per year
  • 100 tonnes per year carbon reduction by reducing travel and classroom based delivery.
  • A very real increase in operational efficiency as a direct consequence of using learning technologies
The attached document highlights how they arrived at these savings and might be useful for others looking to build their business case for change. NCALT are able to provide demonstrable proof of the value of investment in learning technologies to the 43 UK Police Forces.
We appreciate the help and co-operation of Myles O’Connor, Head of Operational Support @ NCALT in compiling this supplementary summary.

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