Conference round up BILD Event – Virtual Environments

by | May 21, 2009 | Articles

It seems that wherever you turn right now the ‘hot topic’ in the field of Learning Technologies is the use of Virtual Worlds (or Environments) and Serious Games and the latest BILD (The British Institute for Learning & Development) Connect Event held on Wednesday 13th Mat 2009 at the Museum of Army Flying, was no exception!

The Towards Maturity team started to focus on this whole area some time ago. We published a review on Serious Virtual Worlds towards the end of 2008

More recently a short paper by Clive Shepherd, created as part of Saffron Interactive’s Advance community, was published to help demystify virtual worlds and their role in learning and to address ‘What are Virtual Worlds and why should businesses invest in them for learning purposes’?.

Finally my colleague Howard Hills has just published a summary report from the Apply Serious Games conference held on 7th May 2009 to support the Apply Serious Games 2009 Awards, so we can see heightened activity in this whole area.

It’s no surprise that BILD should deem it a ‘hot topic’ for their latest Connect Event, but what can we learn from the experiences shared during the day? Well there’s an insight on different forms of simulation, a simple costs benefit analysis chart looking at costs and levels of fidelity and an example of a virtual world training exercise.

The attached document details these and other conference highlights:

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